Medical Professionals and Social Media: Tips on How to Tweet and Post Responsibly

Posted by: Darryl Shrock

Medical Professionals and Social Media: Tips on How to Tweet and Post Responsibly

Do’s
Don’ts

The use of social media platforms in online medical marketing is gradually gaining momentum. Dentists are tweeting their latest services for teeth whitening and chiropractors are posting Facebook updates on how to gain wellness through alternative therapies. With over 51% of Americans having registered accounts in at least one social network—73% of whom log-in on a regular basis—social media has changed the way people interact.

In the same way that you personally interact with others, using social networks requires courtesy and consideration. If you’re a medical professional, the demand for you to be more meticulous and responsible is even greater. So when does a tweet become detrimental to your career? How can you ascertain that you continuously exude absolute professionalism on your Facebook profile? To maintain a good impression on your business’ social sites, here are some rules of social media etiquette that you have to consider:

Have a Different Account for Your Personal Connections

Not bringing your personal life to work is always a good policy. This works the same way for social media. You wouldn’t want your patients to know every detail about your personal life just as much as they probably wouldn’t appreciate seeing their expert surgeon wearing goofy shorts while holding a mug of beer. Your medical social site must remain solely for marketing purposes and business transactions.

Never Post Anything When You’re Upset or Angry

When companies like Surefire Social provide medical practice online marketing ideas and advice to their clients, they emphasize the importance of ‘thinking before clicking.’ If you’ve heard the story of the urologist who damaged his credibility by tweeting his opinion in a disrespectful manner (for all his colleagues and patients to see), then you should realize the dangerous potential of 140 characters and a single click. Therefore, when you’re exhausted or overly emotional, take time to calm down and resist the temptation to rant on your page.

Check Your Grammar

Patients prefer doctors who are well-qualified and highly educated. They wouldn’t put their lives in the hands of someone who doesn’t know what he/she were doing. So, always do your best to project your expertise, even down to correct grammar. Whenever you make posts, initially compose them in word processing programs to check spelling and grammar. Misspelled words and incorrect tenses can be big turn-offs for potential patients.

Have a great and healthy new year!

Darryl Shrock